clarkent:

person: so when did you know you were gay?
me, on the outside: so when did you know you were straight?

me, on the inside: in a time of ancient gods, warlords and kings, a land in turmoil cried out for a hero. she was xena, a mighty princess forged in the heat of battle. the power. the passion. the danger. her courage will change the world.

mickmercury:

prof just explained how gothic fiction was The Gay Genre (being created by and naturally attractive to the kind of people who would write about themes like unacceptable sexuality, secrets, the repressed coming to the surface, despair, exile from society) and honestly? my whole life makes sense now

crazy-pages:

colonelingersoll:

vilesbian:

helpimbeingchasedbywaltwhitman:

*writes I LIKE GIRLS on every other page of my journals so future historians don’t try to insist that I’m straight”

Future straight Historians: “we see several examples of her prioritizing a sisterly bond with the women around her, for example on page 12 she says ‘I like girls’ and throughout the text she references loving women and preferring their company. This is not to say she prioritized above her romantic relationships because on page 78 she mentions talking to a man one time in her life. It’s hard to know just how much she valued her sisterly bond with women due to this one reference of men and the ambiguity of early 21st century slang. For example on page 12 when she said she liked women, the passage continues ’…in a lesbian way. I want to kiss girls, they are so pretty, I’m so gay.’ Now it’s difficult to understand just what that sentence means. We know that in the early 21st century kissing on the cheek in greeting had gone out of vogue but the word gay, a word with an archaic meaning of happiness gives the contextual clues that perhaps she is references that old fashioned practice.

Going back to the nameless man that is mentioned once on page 78 for one sentance…”

“Now, given that she wrote on page 12, ‘Just to be clear: I’m sexually and romantically attracted to women exclusively,’ one may be tempted to read this literally, but we can’t rule out sarcasm.”

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It may seem like @vilesbian is joking, but she really isn’t. 

dettez:

deathlydelicious:

Ok guys, we need to talk about J.C.Leyedecker, and how its a fucking travesty that no one has made a film about him yet.

So Leyendecker was an illustrator during the 1910′s-1940′s. His work was absolutely gorgeous and highly ubiquitous at the time, and his llustrations for the Arrow shirt company created one of the most iconic images of male beauty of the early 20th century. But this icon came with a delicously romantic twist.

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So this image of The Arrow Man was both incredibly macho and well built, but also ethereally pretty and dapper. But the model who the drawing was based on cropped up in A LOT of Leyendeckers work. In many he was engaged in casual social scenes with other men, in others he was shaving in the bathroom or getting dressed, broad shouldered, skin glistening, dark blond hair perfectly in place, jaw sharp as a fucking shovel, but with a slightly rounded chin. In one ad for war bonds he even appeared as the statue of liberty. This same man appeared in hundrereds of drawings, each with the same sharp care and attention to detail which makes looking at him almost feel voyeristic. 

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So this mans image is EVERYWHERE during the early 20th century, and he is a fashion/lifestyle icon for men on par with the female gibson girl. He was the celebrated symbol of male strength, virility, and power. 

And man who modeled for Leyendecker’s iconic univerally adored macho man? That would be his lover, Charles Beach.  

so all this gorgeously homoerotic artwork defined the image of hyper macho masculinity during the interwar period. Leyendecker painted Beach onto the face of the world, that was his love letter. He basically immortalised the love of his life by making the whole world adore him as much as he did.

Leyendecker’s work would go on to influence the likes of F. Scott Fitzgerald and Norman Rockwell. After his death in 1951, when people figured out that the unmarried man he’d been drawing and living with for decades, right up until the time of his death, was actually his lover, Leyendecker’s name has sadly been pushed out of the history books in favour of more wholesome characters.

And that fucking sucks

I would like to request a full length movie, with all the jazz era glamour and steamy romance that this genius deserved. During a time when homosexual men where thought of as weak deviants, this man not only had the nerve to use his lover as the model for all his great works, but he made him into the STANDARD of what it was to be a man. 

J.C. Leyendecker and Charles Beach deserve your rememberance. 

Okay, so this lowkey makes me wanna develop an animated film about JC Leyendecker someday

mastreworld:

thoodleoo:

thoodleoo:

wearing green is gay culture

this may sound like a shitpost but in the 19th century green carnations were a sign of being gay AND in ancient rome, yellowish-green clothing was a sign that a man was effeminate and therefore probably gay, so green is a gay color and only gay people can wear it now

Cover art of Thor Vol 2 No. 64 (July 2003)
Art by Ben Lai (found on Wikipedia)